Pasture has the potential to provide
1. The horses nutrition
2. A Safe exercise area
Potentials rarely achieved, often neglected

All information given here is believed to be correct but the author cannot be responsible for any consequences of it's use.

Pasture Management
for
Horses

by Denis Lindsell
Site Cookie Information

Weeds

Weed Control

Ragwort

Bracken

Marestails

Nettles

Docks

Chickweed

Buttercups

Plantains

Creeping Thistle

Spear Thistle

Dandelion

St. Johns Wort

 


 

Docks - Rumex spp.


Growth Habit

Perennial, thick tap root, broad leaves

Encouraged by

High fertility. Seed spread by Seeding hay containing dock seeds

Physical Control

Pulling by hand, cut before seeds become viable (docks produce a large number of seeds), hard grazing by sheep (cattle, sheep, and goats are more likely to eat docks than are horses).

Chemical Control

MCPA controls seedlings, with Dicamba being more effective. Glyphosate may be applied by weed wiper or spot treatment to plants near flowering stage.

Toxicity

None, although the plant's oxalic acid content may reduce the availability of dietry calcium to the horse. However, horses do not normally eat docks.


Two species of dock, the Broad Leaved Dock and the Curled Leaved Dock are covered by the Weed Act of 1959 and you can be forced by law to eradicate these.