Pasture has the potential to provide
1. The horses nutrition
2. A Safe exercise area
Potentials rarely achieved, often neglected

All information given here is believed to be correct but the author cannot be responsible for any consequences of it's use.

Pasture Management
for
Horses

by Denis Lindsell
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Weeds

Weed Control

Ragwort

Bracken

Marestails

Nettles

Docks

Chickweed

Buttercups

Plantains

Creeping Thistle

Spear Thistle

Dandelion

St. Johns Wort

 


 

St. Johns Wort - Hypericum spp.


Growth Habit

Perennial, leaves sessile and alternate.

The perforate St. Johns Wort is so called because the leaves appear to have pin- prick holes in them when held up to the light.

Most have two obvious ribs along the length of the stem, except the Square Stemmed St. Johns Wort, which has four.

Flowers yellow, five petals.

Encouraged by

 

Chemical Control

 

Physical Control

 

Toxicity

Flowers and leaves are toxic containing hypericin (Photosensistivity)

Symptoms in horses Peeling skin, loss of appetite, staggering gait, coma.


Common or Perforate St. Johns Wort Hypericum perforatum
Common St John's Wort

St. Johns Wort Flower
Closeup of St John's Wort flower

Perforate St. Johns Wort Stem
Close up of the stem of St John's Wort

Leaf of Perforate St. Johns Wort

Young Square Stemmed St. Johns Wort Hypericum tetrapterum
Young Square Stemmed St john's Wort